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Extension Theorems II

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Theorem. Let L/K be an algebraic extension. Every field homomorphism Φ: K → C where C is an algebraically closed field, can be extended to a homomorphism L → C

![Image](/maths/extensionTheoremb.md ./maths/images/extensionTheoremb.jpeg) 

Proof.

Let S be the set of pairs (F, f) where F is an intermediate field between K and L, f: F → C is a field homomorphism such that f|K = Φ. S = {(F, f): K ⊆ F ⊆ L, f: F → C, homomorphism, f|K = Φ}. ![Image](/maths/extensionTheoremb.md ./maths/images/extensionTheoremb.jpeg) 

L | F K Φ f ' - / Φ C f f i a i e l s l g d e a b h r f o a i m i e o c l m d o c r l h p o o h s m i e o s d m m o r p h i s m , f | = Φ

By assumption the subset {(Fα,fα)}α ∈ A is totally order ⇒ (Fα, fα) ≤ (Fβ, fβ) or (Fβ, fβ) ≤ (Fα, fα). If (Fα, fα) ≤ (Fβ, fβ) ⇒ [By our order definition, fβ|Fα = fα] fβ(x) = fα(x) ∀x ∈ Fα and we are done. The argument in the second case is completely the same (aka mutatis mutandis).

By Zorn’s lemma, S has a maximal element (F, σ): F is a field between K and L (K ⊆ F ⊆ L), with a homomorphism σ: F → C such that σ|K = Φ. Futhermore, it is a maximal element, so it means that there is no extension of σ to a homomorphism from a larger intermediate field to C. Claim: F = L, that is, Φ is extended to a homomorphism L → C by σ

Let’s suppose for the sake of contradiction, F ≠ L ⇒ [K ⊆ F ⊆ L] ∃ a ∈ L, a ∉ F ⇒ F(a)/F is a finite extension of degree greater than 1. Then, we could extend σ to a homomorphism F(a) → C. Let p(x) be the minimal polynomial for a in F[x], so there is an F-isomorphism F(a) ≋ F[x]/⟨p(x)⟩.

Applying σ to the coefficients of p(x) gives a polynomial pσ(x) ∈ C[x] ⇒ [C is algebraically closed] pσ(x) has a root in C, say r.

Let’s define a ring homomorphism F[x] → C, acting as σ on F, and x → r. It sends p(x) to pσ(r) = [r is a root of pσ] 0, so we get an induced homomorphism F(x)/⟨p(x)⟩ → C acting as σ on F and [$\bar x$ = x + ⟨p(x)⟩ → r] sending $\bar x$ to r. Composing the isomorphism F(a) ≋ F[x]/⟨p(x)⟩ with this induced homomorphism F(x)/⟨p(x)⟩ → C gives us a homomorphism τ: F(a) → C acting as σ on F ⇒ (F, σ) ≤ (F(a), τ) ⊥ (F, σ) is a maximal element, F ≠ F(a) (a ∉ F).

τ = F-isomorphism, F(a) → F[x]/⟨p(x)⟩ composed with F(x)/⟨p(x)⟩ → C, $\bar x$ = x + ⟨p(x)⟩ → r acting as σ on F.

Theorem. Let K be a field and i: K → L be a homomorphism to a field L such that L/i(K) is an algebraic extension. If ϕ is a field homomorphism ϕ: K → C, and C is an algebraically closed field, then there is a field homomorphism σ : L → C such that σ ◦ i = ϕ (it makes the following diagram commute)

i L K σ / C ϕ a n a l g e b r a i c a l l y c l o s e d f i e l d

Proof.

Since “i” is a field homomorphism ⇒ i is injective ⇒ K ≋ i(K). We can use the same argument as before but using:

  1. S = {(F, f): F field, i(K) ⊆ F ⊆ L, f∘i: F → C, homomorphism, f∘i = Φ}.
  2. Define a partially order on S by declaring (F, f) ≤ (F’, f’) if F ⊆ F’ and f’|F = f.
  3. For a totally order subset {(Fα,fα)}α ∈ A in S, an upper bound can be obtained as follows. Let F = $\cup_{α∈A} F_α$, F is a field (since the Fα’s are totally ordered) f: F → C defined by f(x) = fα(x) when x ∈ Fα.
  4. By Zorn’s lemma, S has a maximal element (F, σ): F is a field between i(K) and L (i(K) ⊆ F ⊆ L), with a homomorphism σ: F → C such that σ∘i = Φ. Futhermore, it is a maximal element, so it means that there is no extension of σ to a homomorphism from a larger intermediate field to C. Claim: F = L ⇒ σ: L → C such that σ∘i = Φ (it is left to the reader as an exercise).

Proof.

Assume F is algebraically closed, let f(x) ∈ F[x] be non-constant ⇒ ∃α ∈F: f(α) = 0 ⇒[Factor Theorem, F field, f ∈ F[x], α ∈ F is a zero or root of f, i.e., f(α) = 0 ↭ (x -α)|f(x)] f(x) = (x -α)g(x) for some g(x) ∈ F[x].

If g(x) is not constant ⇒ ∃β ∈ F: g(β) = 0, hence g(x) = (x -β)h(x) and f(x) = (x -α)(x -β)h(x) for some h(x) ∈ F[x]. If we continue this process, we can express f(x) as a product of linear polynomials.

Proof. If f(x) is not linear, then we can write it as a product of more than one linear factor, which means that it is not irreducible

Proof.

Suppose for the sake of contradiction, E is a proper algebraic extension of F. Let α ∈ E an algebraic element, α ∉ F ⇒[Corollary. Let F be an algebraically closed field, and let f(x) ∈ F[x] be irreducible. Then, f(x) is linear] The irreducible polynomial of α, irr(α, F) ∈ F[x] must be linear, and since α is a zero of irr(α, F) we must have irr(α, F) = x - α ⇒[irr(α, F) = x - α ∈ F[x]] α ∈ F ⊥ Hence, E = F.

Theorem. All algebraic closures of a field are isomorphic. Let C1 and C2 be algebraic closures of a field K with embeddings i1 : K → C1 and i2 : K → C2 respectively, then there is a field isomorphism σ that makes the following diagram commute.

C i - \ σ - K / C i , C & C a l g e b r a i c c l o s u r e s o f K

Proof. Since C2 is algebraically closed and C1 is an algebraic extension of i1(K) ⇒ [i: K → L homomorphism, L/i(K) is an algebraic extension. ϕ field homomorphism: K → C, and C is an algebraically closed field, then there is a field homomorphism σ : L → C such that σ ◦ i = ϕ] There is a field homomorphism σ: C1 → C2 such that σ ◦ i1 = i2

The image σ(C1) is an algebraically closed field that contains σ(i1(K)) = i2(K). Since C2 is an algebraic extension of i2(K) ⇒ C2/σ(C1) is an algebraic extension of an algebraically closed field ⇒ [Any algebraically closed field F has no proper algebraic extension] the extension C2/σ(C1) is trivial ⇒ σ(C1) = C2 ⇒ σ: C1 → C2 is not just a field homomorphism (injective), but a field isomorphism ⇒ σ ◦ i1 = i2 is a field isomorphism, and the diagram commute.

Exercise. Let p be a prime number, find the splitting field of Xp -2 over ℚ and its degree over ℚ.

Solution.

Let K be the splitting field fo xp -2 over ℚ. Its roots are $ξ_p^i\sqrt[p]{2}∈\mathbb{R}$, where ξp is a primitive pth root of unity, 0 ≤ i ≤ p-1 ⇒ K = ℚ($ξ_p, \sqrt[p]{2}$), e.g., K = $ℚ(\sqrt[3]{2}, w)$ is the splitting field of x3 -2 over ℚ

By Eisenstein criteria Xp -2 is irreducible polynomial over ℚ, and the irreducible polynomial of ξp is not xp -1 because it factors (x -1)(xp-1 + xp-2 + x2 + x +1 ), but it is indeed (xp-1 + xp-2 + x2 + x +1 ) that is irreducible (Corollary For any prime p, the pth cyclotomic polynomial Φp(x) = $\frac{x^p-1}{x-1}=x^{p-1}+x^{p-2}+···+x+1$ is irreducible over ℚ.) ⇒ [$\mathbb{Q}(\sqrt[p]{2}): ℚ$] = p, [ℚ(ξp): ℚ] = p -1.

n = [K : $\mathbb{Q}(\sqrt[p]{2})$][$\mathbb{Q}(\sqrt[p]{2}) : \mathbb{Q}$] = [K : $\mathbb{Q}(\sqrt[p]{2})$]·p ⇒ p | n and n ≤ p(p -1) that’s because K = $(\mathbb{Q}\sqrt[p]{2})(ξ_p)$ ⇒ [K : $\mathbb{Q}(\sqrt[p]{2})$] ≤ p-1.

Analogously, n = [K : ℚ(ξp)][$\mathbb{Q}(ξ_p) : \mathbb{Q}$] = [K : ℚ(ξp)]·(p-1) ⇒ (p-1) | n. Then, p | n, (p-1) | n, n ≤ p(p -1), p prime ⇒ n = p(p-1).

Proposition. Let K/F be an algebraic extension, let σ: K → K be an F-homomorphism. Then, σ is an isomorphism. Every F-homomorphism between K to itself is an isomorphism.

Proof.

By assumption σ is an F-homomorphism ⇒ it is injective [σ(a) = σ(b) ⇒ σ(a)-σ(b) = σ(a -b) = 0 = σ(0). If u = (a-b) = 0 ⇒ we are done, a = b. Otherwise, u ≠ 0 ⇒ σ(u)σ(u-1) = σ(1) = 1, but that means σ(u)σ(u-1) =[σ(u) = σ(a-b) = 0] 0σ(u-1) = 1 ⊥

Let α ∈ K be an arbitrary element. K/F is an algebraic extension, therefore α is algebraic over F, so let us consider its irreducible polynomial f ∈ F[x] over F. Let A = {α = α1, α2, ···, αn} be the set of all roots of f in K (it may not be the set of all roots of f -f does not necessarily splits completely in K-, but at least there is an element, α itself).

Theorem [K, L be two extension fields of F. α ∈ K is algebraic over F. Let σ: K → L be an F-homomorphism of fields. Then, σ(α) is algebraic over F, too and its irreducible polynomial over F is the same as the irreducible polynomial of α over F] σ(αi) = αj, ∀i, j = 1,···, n, and therefore σ(A) ⊆ A. Let’s restrict σ to A, σA = σ|A, it is well defined because σ(A) ⊆ A, it is injective because σ is an injective map from K to K, and it is surjective because it is an injective map from a finite map to itself ⇒ ∃αi ∈ A: σ(αi) = α1 = α, and therefore σ: K → K is surjective (∀α∈ K, ∃αi ∈ A ⊆ K, σ(αi) = α1 = α), hence an isomorphism∎

Bibliography

This content is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. This post relies heavily on the following resources, specially on NPTEL-NOC IITM, Introduction to Galois Theory, Michael Penn, and Contemporary Abstract Algebra, Joseph, A. Gallian.
  1. NPTEL-NOC IITM, Introduction to Galois Theory.
  2. Algebra, Second Edition, by Michael Artin.
  3. LibreTexts, Abstract and Geometric Algebra, Abstract Algebra: Theory and Applications (Judson).
  4. Field and Galois Theory, by Patrick Morandi. Springer.
  5. Michael Penn (Abstract Algebra), and MathMajor.
  6. Contemporary Abstract Algebra, Joseph, A. Gallian.
  7. Andrew Misseldine: College Algebra and Abstract Algebra.
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